Ripple Effect is the all-female Arnhem Land rock band making waves for women in music

Ripple Effect is a group of seven Maningrida women led by manager Jodie Kell, who is based in Sydney but has lived in the West Arnhem community.

Its songs switch between a handful of Indigenous languages and members swap instruments between songs.

And while an eight-person Indigenous girl group is something of a rarity, the formula seems to be working; it’s grabbing the attention of tastemakers, getting some airtime on triple j, and will release an EP in coming months.

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Gurrumul (PG) – Film Review

Opening in cinemas at the same time as his final album tops the ARIA charts, this documentary offers an intimate look at the life of Gurrumul – the singer with an angelic voice who raised awareness of Yolngu culture around the world.

The contrast between crass commercial exploitation of musicians in the search for fame and record sales, and a genuine artist who was connected with his people, culture and country, is clearly documented. To see Gurrumul live was a heartwarming, exceptional experience because you knew you were in the presence of genius.

Gurrumul is a film for everyone, just as his music is: it is a film about triumph over adversity and the existence of hope in tragedy. It provides a glimpse of how respect for Indigenous culture may lead to a renewed relationship between the non-Indigenous and Indigenous Australians, something which can only come from a true recognition, understanding and valuing of Indigenous people and culture.

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Gurrumul’s final gift: Australia’s most original recording?

Djarimirri (Child of the Rainbow) is released on Skinnyfish Music today.

It is the result of five years of work and unlike any previous Australian recording. It’s a synthesis of ancient Aboriginal chants, modern orchestral minimalism and the complex rhythmic patterns of Elcho Island’s yidaki (the Yolgnu word for didgeridoo) playing.

It is a unique and hugely significant contribution to Australian music.

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Dhapanbal Yunupingu will sing songs at the National Folk Festival

The daughter of one of Australia’s best-known Indigenous musicians is making her festival debut at the National Folk Festival as a solo artist.

Dhapanbal Yunupingu, 35, is the third of six daughters of Dr M Yunupingu, the lead singer of Yothu Yindi.

“I’m going to play some of my original songs including my single Mari Wurrapa [Grandmother Whale],” she said. She will also sing some Yothu Yindi numbers arranged for her voice.

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Black Panther’s universe features an ‘independent Wales’

Black Panther has been praised for the positive image it presents of Africa through the fictional country of Wakanda.

The film has also got viewers excited over another country it seemingly paints in an empowering light.

When Wakanda’s King T’Challa presents at the United Nations, he stands on stage alongside a Welsh flag.

It’s left viewers wondering whether Wales is independent in this Marvel universe.

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Gurrumul’s life documented in new film

WHEN documenting the life of blind indigenous artist Geoffrey Gurrumul Yunipingu, an “enormous amount of research” was required, according to director Paul Williams.

Gurrumul is a portrait of an artist on the brink of global reverence, and the struggles he and those close to him faced in balancing that which mattered most to him and keeping the show on the road.

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Rising hip-hop star Baker Boy is making a trip of the tongue

RISING hip-hop star Baker Boy only started rapping a year ago, and has only released two songs.

But his ever-growing fan base just voted both those songs into the world’s biggest musical countdown, Triple J’s Hottest 100 — his latest single Marryuna at No.17, and his debut track Cloud 9 (featuring Kian) at No.76.

That’s a pretty amazing achievement. But the 21-year-old “Fresh Prince of Arnhem Land” — who was raised in the Northern Territory’s Milingimbi community before moving to Melbourne three years ago — is even more proud of the fact that he’s helping introduce listeners to his traditional language, Yolngu Matha.

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‘Didgeridoo is his voice’: how Djalu Gurruwiwi embodies the sound of a continent

The Indigenous elder revered by some as ‘Australia’s Dalai Lama’ is the spiritual keeper of the didgeridoo. A new exhibition honours his legacy and the immense significance of the Yolngu instrument that is helping to heal a divided country.

He is Djalu Gurruwiwi: a Yolngu elder and lawman from north-east Arnhem Land, a songster, healer, virtuoso and master craftsman of the yidaki (didgeridoo), as well as the instrument’s spiritual keeper. From up here he surveys his Australian Rules team, smiles and nods in approval as his players go through their pre-season paces, calling for the ball and kicking and marking, on this humid morning.

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