Baby Boy Born in Ambulance

Only days after Australia’s population hit 25 million people, a baby boy has become the latest addition to the country’s population, when he was born just before 3am this morning in the back of an ambulance in remote East Arnhem Land.

When going into labour, the 18-year-old mother was talked through her contractions by a St John Ambulance Emergency Dispatcher via phone, while paramedics were en-route to the community of Yirrkala.

With the help of the paramedics the young woman gave birth to a baby boy in the back of the ambulance.

Both mum and baby were taken to Gove District Hospital.

Higher-than-anticipated birth rates and mass migration have seen the country’s population increase to 25 million earlier this week – 33 years earlier than predicted two decades ago.

Wanuwuy Closure

We would like to inform residents and visitors that Wanuwuy (Cape Arnhem) will be closed for a period of six weeks between the 8th of August and the 17th of September. This decision has been made by the Traditional Owners for that country.

We are entering a period of peak turtle nesting activity, and would like to give the turtles and hatchlings the best chance of survival. Wanuwuy is a key nesting area for Green Turtles in particular, but this region is inhabited by six of the world’s seven species and all of these are listed nationally as vulnerable or endangered. An individual female Green Turtle nests approximately every 3 years, and lays 1-6 clutches of between 70 and 110 eggs. Only one in one thousand hatchlings survives to maturity, so we need to give them a helping hand.

We appreciate the inconvenience this may cause, and thank everybody for their patience during this time. Bookings for Wanuwuy can be made for after this closure period. Key Traditional Owners will continue to have access to this area during the closure period, but everyone else will be excluded.

Flanagan issues clear warning at Garma

Australian novelist Richard Flanagan says the Turnbull government wrote itself out of history and wasted a chance at reconciliation when it rejected last year’s Uluru Statement which recommended giving Aboriginal people a voice in parliament.

Mr Flanagan said most Australians didn’t know about and would be horrified at the full extent of massacres and “wars of extermination” that had never ended for Aboriginal people to this day.

“My warning is this: if we here in Australia do not re-imagine ourselves we will be undone,” he said.

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Garma festival: Indigenous sovereignty would be a ‘gift for all Australians’

The annual Garma festival in northeast Arnhem Land opened for the 20th year on Friday with attendees told that Indigenous sovereignty would be a “gift for all the Australian people”.

At a ceremonial welcome at the Gulkula grounds on Gumatj country, senior Gumatj ceremony man, Djunga Djunga Yunupingu, said a year ago they had been speaking with hope about the Uluru statement and its three proposals for constitutional reform.

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Yunupingu calls out government over land

The colonisation of Australia was wrong and illegal and more land should be handed back to traditional owners, says activist Galarrwuy Yunupingu.

Aboriginal leader Galarrwuy Yunupingu has told the federal government it must face up to the fact the colonisation of Australia was wrong and illegal and more land should be handed back to traditional owners.

Dr Yunupingu, a 70-year-old land rights activist and leader of the Gumatj clan of the Yolngu people, opened the 20th Garma Festival in East Arnhem Land, where he made the remarks, on Friday.

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Marine debris on north Australian beaches doubles in a decade; foreign fishers may be to blame, researchers say

Trash from the sea washing up on Arnhem Land’s once-pristine beaches has doubled in the last decade.

Researchers say there is up to three tonnes of marine debris per kilometre along 11 monitored beaches in northern Australia, and that much of it is related to increasing foreign fishing activity, some of it illegal.

In June, the ABC spoke with residents of Cape Arnhem, near Nhulunbuy, who detailed the level of rubbish that was washing up on local beaches.

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NT Police have attended 12,192 domestic violence incidents in this year alone

STANDING in stark contrast to the picturesque and peaceful Yirrkala coastline behind it, the Aboriginal Family Violence Policing Conference has painted a detailed picture of abuse in the NT.

As conversations and workshops kicked off on Thursday, NT Police Commissioner Reece Kershaw told delegates he was not going to shy away from the current situation and delivered new insights into the issues.

“This year alone, we’ve attended 27,352 alcohol related incidents and 12,192 domestic violence related incidents,” he said.

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RV Tourists to Benefit from New Tourist Dump Point

Nhulunbuy Corporation in association with the Caravan and Motorhome Club of Australia (CMCA) has recently completed the installation of a Tourist Dump Point in town located on Bottlebrush Avenue (between Hindle Oval 1 and 2). Signage has also been installed from Melville Bay Road to direct traffic to the new facility.

CMCA has sponsored the installation of over 330 Dump Points around Australia, but this is just the 5th such dump point to be installed in the Northern Territory. The provision of easily accessible dump points encourages more self-contained tourism, benefiting both regional and rural centres from the increase in visitation to the Community by RV tourists, while the environment also benefits from responsible waste disposal.

Daughter of Arnhem Land honoured

Raised on Yirrkala mission in Arnhem Land in the 1950s, Ms Marika was initially tutored in traditional bark painting by her artist father Mawalan Marika, who encouraged her and her sisters to paint the ancestral creation stories of their clan, an activity typically reserved only for Yolngu men.

In addition to her forging her own artistic path, Ms Marika has assisted other artists and become a powerful advocate for the protection of Indigenous art and culture.

As a traditional landowner at Yirrkala, she is both inspired and determined to ensure her Yolngu language and homeland in Yalangbara (Port Bradshaw) – one of the most significant sacred sites in north-east Arnhem Land region – is protected and recognised.

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