Tag: arnhem land

America’s 51st state: North Australia

Australia’s celebrated Arnhem Land aerospace project, rather than being dedicatedly civilian as the nation was media-led to believe, will have a US military component. Can the town of Nhulunbuy be permitted to survive? Probably not. Rio Tinto’s bauxite mine will soon close and the only other functions of the town are as a servicing hub for local Aboriginal communities and as a staging post for tourism. Obviously, both roles will end. And the Indigenous population? Without access to Songline sites, morale will collapse, and Arnhem Aboriginal culture will go into terminal decline.

Read More

Yirrkala

Yirrkala is an indigenous community in East Arnhem Shire, Northern Territory of Australia.[1] It is 18 km South-East from the large mining town of Nhulunbuy in Arnhem Land. In the 2016 census, Yirrkala had a population of 809 people.[2]

History

At the 2006 census, Yirrkala had a population of 687.[3]

There has been an indigenous community at Yirrkala throughout recorded history, but the community increased enormously in size when Yirrkala mission was founded in 1935. Local governance and planning are now the responsibility of the Yolngu-led Dhanbul, which is roughly equivalent to a Shire Council in non-indigenous communities.

At the 2006 census, Yirrkala had a population of 687.[3]

Yirrkala is also home to a number of Mission Aviation Fellowship pilots and engineers based in Arnhem Land providing air transport services.

Culture

Yirrkala is home to a number of leading indigenous artists, whose traditional Aboriginal art, particularly bark painting, can be found in art galleries around the world, and whose work frequently wins awards such as the Telstra National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Awards.[4] Their work is available to the public from the Buku-Larrnggay Mulka Art Centre and Museum[5] and also from the YBE art centre.

It is also a traditional home of the Yidaki (didgeridoo), and some of the world’s finest didgeridoos are still made at Yirrkala.

Land rights

Yirrkala played a pivotal role in the development of the relationship between indigenous and non-indigenous Australians when the document Bark Petition was created at Yirrkala in 1963 and sent to the Federal Government to protest at the Prime Minister’s announcement that a parcel of their land was to be sold to a bauxite mining company. Although the petition itself was unsuccessful in the sense that the bauxite mining at Nhulunbuy went ahead as planned, it alerted non-indigenous Australians to the need for indigenous representation in such decisions, and prompted a government report recommending payment of compensation, protection of sacred sites, creation of a permanent parliamentary standing committee to scrutinise developments at Yirrkala, and also acknowledged the indigenous people’s moral right to their lands. The Bark Petition is on display in the Parliament House in Canberra.[6]

Heritage listings

One of the Wurrwurrwuy stone arrangements

Yirrkala has a number of heritage-listed sites, including:

Notable people

 

Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.

That was 2018

As 2018 draws to a close we decided to revisit some of the stories affecting the region throughout the year, so we suggest you pour yourself your preferred tipple, grab a mince pie, crank up “Fairytale of New York” and journey through some of the stories and articles our volunteers gathered for you in 2018.

Read More

Fatal crash in Arnhem Land

Overnight police responded to a report of a single vehicle crash in a remote area of North East Arnhem Land approximately 100km from Nhulunbuy. Acting Commander Warren Jackson of Northern Command confirmed that a 23-year-old female was killed as a result.

Read More

Words from Arnhem land: Aboriginal health messages need to be made with us rather than for us

We have our own ways of understanding illness and health. Only by using our own words, metaphors that are meaningful to us, and a communication style that is respectful, can we hear the messaging from health professionals. This means the health messages need to be made with us rather than for us.

Tailored messaging using local footage offers the best chance of engaging viewers. We need to help make the stories if our communities are to trust and understand the information.

Read More

Working Together to Close The Gap On Oral Health

Working together to close the gap on oral health

Sitting in a portable dental chair in a small community in remote northeast Arnhem Land, a young child is having fluoride painted onto his teeth.

It will help prevent tooth decay in an area of Australia where there is no fluoride in the water and where it can be difficult to visit a dental practitioner.

Bachelor of Oral Health student Caitlin Wilkie checks a young boy’s teeth. Picture: Supplied

The person applying the fluoride, and checking the young boy’s teeth, is a University of Melbourne student on a four-week immersion program as part of her studies.

“Until you are up there, on country, it is impossible to understand the challenges and the complexities with regards to health,” says final year Bachelor of Oral Health student Laura James, who spent five weeks earlier this year working in the region.

The Melbourne Dental School is working with Miwatj Health Aboriginal Corporation to tackle the issue of oral health in these remote communities. Together with the other community health providers in the region, they are working on an Oral Health Plan for East Arnhem Land.

“The problem the local community has identified is that dental disease is up to four and a half times worse than in non-Indigenous communities,” says Professor Julie Satur, who leads the Melbourne Dental School work on country in northeast Arnhem Land.

“Our project has come from the community, which is really important. They have identified the problem and we’re bringing the expertise and some of the resources and power of the University to build capacity to help address it.”

Laura James and her fellow students were based in Nhulunbuy and travelled to clinics and schools in remote communities across the region.

“We were doing fillings and extractions but also prevention and health promotion, working with children from pre-school to grade six. And for some of these children, English can be their fourth or fifth language,” Laura says.

Bachelor of Oral Health students Laura James (left) and Caitlin Wilkie (right) produced picture books to help share the importance of good oral health with children living in remote communities. Picture: Supplied

Once they realised that language could be a barrier to oral health, the students decided to produce picture books, using their textbooks and images found online, which they laminated and took to schools and health clinics in remote communities.

“And we found that these picture books really resonated with the children.”

Professor Satur says access to dental care and a lack of preventive care is an issue for people living in remote communities. She says part of the University’s role is helping to bring together the services on offer in the region.

It also includes contributing policy and research evidence to inform planning, bringing in students who can help with clinical and outreach dental services and boost service capacity, and providing support for locally driven research.

“If we can get this plan working, there are things in it we can achieve – around health promotion, tooth brushing programs in schools, getting the water fluoridation plants running and thinking about how we shape our messaging to fit with beliefs that already exist,” she says.

“You know, instead of imposing beliefs on people, how do we work with existing cultural beliefs and Indigenous knowledge to improve oral health.

“A preventive approach, in my view, is the way to tackle this. It’s not going to produce fast solutions but I’m more interested in sustainability and having the community empowered to deal with the problem than riding in on a white horse and doing a heap of fillings and leaving town. That is not to say that providing treatment is not important – but on its own it is not enough.

“I think the really important bit of work we have to do is at community level – understanding how people and communities think about oral health and what they see as the problems and what they see as the solutions, because they’re the experts in their own lives. It is also important that over the longer term we develop pathways for Yolgnu people to lead these programs themselves.”

Bachelor of Oral Health students completed a four-week immersion program in remote northeast Arnhem Land. Picture: Supplied

Professor Satur says poor oral health is related to systemic health issues including heart disease, diabetes, kidney disease and premature birth – both contributing to and making these conditions worse. But she says it can also be a social determinant.

“Toothache will stop a child performing at school,” she says.

“If they have chronic infection and pain in their mouth they don’t sleep or eat properly, and the family doesn’t sleep properly, the child goes to school and their learning is impeded, they fall behind, they don’t want to be there and then they stop going.”

The University of Melbourne has a long relationship with the Yolgnu people in northeast Arnhem Land, which was formalised in 2015 through a partnership with the Yothu Yindi Foundation. The oral health project is one of several that have developed as a result of this partnership.

Professor Satur believes the importance of having students on country in Arnhem Land is twofold.

She says it is important that they have the opportunity to understand local community perspectives on oral health, what they see as the problems and what they see as the solutions.

“But I also want to make sure that we produce a workforce that cares about the gap in Indigenous oral health and wants to do something about it.

“And really mainstreaming Aboriginal culture and knowledge in Australia, making it a celebrated part of how we understand the world.”

 

This article was first published on Pursuit. Read the original article.