Tag: arnhem land

Arnhem Land beaches reaching crisis point as Indonesian waste floats ashore

It was a video seen by millions of people worldwide: a diver swimming through Indonesian waters thick with plastic pollution on a scale he said he’d never seen before.

But one of the frontlines of this global problem is much further out of the spotlight, on remote Australian beaches so pristine and well protected that some require a permit before you can set foot on them.

“That is the vision you’d imagine when you go to these beaches — they’re so remote and totally untouched,” said Luke Playford, sea country facilitator with the Dhimurru Aboriginal Corporation.

Bali’s fake ‘Made in Australia’ boomerangs and didgeridoos robbing artists of a living

An undercover 60 Minutes investigation has exposed the Australian businesses importing fake Aboriginal artefacts from Indonesia to sell in Australian tourism stores.

The shocking exploitation of more than 40,000 years of indigenous culture has resulted in Aboriginal artists no longer being able to compete in the market – which was one of the largest remaining sources of independent income for indigenous communities.

Reporter Liam Bartlett began the investigation in the ancestral birthplace of the didgeridoo in Arnhem Land, Northern Australia.

Joining the dots

The British first came to the coastline of Arnhem land, in the northern territory of Australia, in the beginning of the 19th century.

They discovered summer shelters of the aboriginal people, which were temporary, built with sheets of bark and illustrations on the inside. These illustrations attracted the British and they stole these when the community was not around. Interest grew about these artworks in England by the museums when the colonisers took the art back.

After some 226 years of racism and marginalisation against indigenous people, their art and culture are finally at the forefront of Australian identity. The art “is tens of thousands of years old but also contemporary,” says Cubillo.

Gurrumul (PG) – Film Review

Opening in cinemas at the same time as his final album tops the ARIA charts, this documentary offers an intimate look at the life of Gurrumul – the singer with an angelic voice who raised awareness of Yolngu culture around the world.

The contrast between crass commercial exploitation of musicians in the search for fame and record sales, and a genuine artist who was connected with his people, culture and country, is clearly documented. To see Gurrumul live was a heartwarming, exceptional experience because you knew you were in the presence of genius.

Gurrumul is a film for everyone, just as his music is: it is a film about triumph over adversity and the existence of hope in tragedy. It provides a glimpse of how respect for Indigenous culture may lead to a renewed relationship between the non-Indigenous and Indigenous Australians, something which can only come from a true recognition, understanding and valuing of Indigenous people and culture.

Daughter of Arnhem Land honoured

Raised on Yirrkala mission in Arnhem Land in the 1950s, Ms Marika was initially tutored in traditional bark painting by her artist father Mawalan Marika, who encouraged her and her sisters to paint the ancestral creation stories of their clan, an activity typically reserved only for Yolngu men.

In addition to her forging her own artistic path, Ms Marika has assisted other artists and become a powerful advocate for the protection of Indigenous art and culture.

As a traditional landowner at Yirrkala, she is both inspired and determined to ensure her Yolngu language and homeland in Yalangbara (Port Bradshaw) – one of the most significant sacred sites in north-east Arnhem Land region – is protected and recognised.

Action thriller ‘HIGH GROUND’ Casting Call

We’re looking for ABORIGINAL actors keen to play a variety of roles. New stars to be found!!! No experience necessary. This is a nationwide search for ABORIGINAL MEN AND WOMEN aged 16-65yrs.

Reuniting director Stephen Johnson and writer Chris Anastassiades, creatives behind award-winning film YOLNGU BOY.

Witiyana Marika, Jack Thompson and the team are working with local communities, the Kakadu Board of Management and Traditional Owners including Jonathan Nadji, Alfred Nayingul, Adrian Gumurdal and Jeffrey Lee.

Read More

The new GPSLSC clubhouse open for business Friday the 27th April

It has finally happened!!!!

The Certificate of Occupancy has been issued and Liquor Licencing have sent our certificate to commence trading from the new clubhouse.

This means next Friday the 27th April the new GPSLSC clubhouse will be open for business.

This is very exciting not only for the club but for our entire community. A brand new, state of the art building and kitchen.

After nearly 12 months of hard work we have something we can all be proud of.

Get on down to the Surfy this Friday and join in with what we hope will be one of the biggest nights Nhulunbuy will have seen in a long time.

Live broadcast by Gove FM, music, good food, cold drinks and a secure place for the kids to run.

A time to celebrate.

See you all there!!!!!

Arnhem Land artists’ Sydney exhibition links ancient stories with political advocacy

In a small pocket of Arnhem Land called Maningrida, Deborah Wurrikidj has been working long days.

But the artist of more than 20 years said the hours go fast, as she pulls the ancient stories of her homeland into a contemporary exhibition set to be showcased at The Cross Arts Project in Sydney from April 20 until May 26.

Deborah, along with her sister Jennifer Wurrkidj and aunt Susan Marawarr, will also travel to the exhibition, which they sent art to last year but were unable to attend.

Gurrumul’s final gift: Australia’s most original recording?

Djarimirri (Child of the Rainbow) is released on Skinnyfish Music today.

It is the result of five years of work and unlike any previous Australian recording. It’s a synthesis of ancient Aboriginal chants, modern orchestral minimalism and the complex rhythmic patterns of Elcho Island’s yidaki (the Yolgnu word for didgeridoo) playing.

It is a unique and hugely significant contribution to Australian music.

Yolŋu Sign Language: An Undocumented Language of Arnhem Land

by Elaine Maypilama & Dany Adone

Recently there has been an increase in studies documenting the world’s languages. Most of these studies concentrate on spoken languages but there is a growing effort to document sign languages. In this short paper we describe one of the many undocumented sign languages of Arnhem Land in the Northern Territory of Australia. This Indigenous sign language is known locally as Yolŋu Sign Language (YSL). Although this language is used in daily interaction, many of its users are not aware that it is a language per se. With this brief description of YSL we hope to make our readers aware of the existence of this language. Another aim of this paper is to generate some general discussion on the status of Indigenous sign languages in Arnhem Land, which we believe have become endangered. Although YSL is an endangered language there are still measures that can be taken to prevent this language disappearing.

[sdm_download id=”19289″ fancy=”0″]