Tag: yothu yindi

‘One of the most profound experiences of my life’

Sometimes, in order to learn, you need to slow down and shut up. Which is exactly what my TV crew and I were told to do when we entered the sacred ceremonial grounds at Gulkula in North East Arnhem Land, the home of the Yolgnu clan for more than 50,000 years.

While flying along the red dirt road to the campsite for the Garma festival, I carefully read the “behaviour protocols” provided by the Yothu Yindi foundation. They state: “Remember you are on Yolngu land and entering Yolngu time.

Dhapanbal Yunupingu will sing songs at the National Folk Festival

The daughter of one of Australia’s best-known Indigenous musicians is making her festival debut at the National Folk Festival as a solo artist.

Dhapanbal Yunupingu, 35, is the third of six daughters of Dr M Yunupingu, the lead singer of Yothu Yindi.

“I’m going to play some of my original songs including my single Mari Wurrapa [Grandmother Whale],” she said. She will also sing some Yothu Yindi numbers arranged for her voice.

$500m meant for Indigenous services was spent elsewhere by NT government

Yothu Yindi Foundation studies GST revenue figures for 2015-16 and finds disadvantaged communities were shortchanged

The Northern Territory underspent about $500m in GST payments meant for disadvantaged Indigenous communities in 2015-16, the Yothu Yindi Foundation has told the Productivity Commission’s GST review.

It accused governments of running policies that prevented Indigenous people in the NT from contributing to the economy and participating in the wealth of the nation.

“The full potential of the Territory will never be realised until Aboriginal people living in remote and regional parts of the Territory are able to assume a rightful place in its economic and social life,” the foundation’s chief executive, Denise Bowden, said.

Founder of Yothu Yindi says African gangs “an insult to First Australians”

ONE of Australia’s most senior Aboriginal tribal leaders has delivered a sharp message to African gangs causing fear across Melbourne, telling them that their poor behaviour is an insult to the First Australians.

Witiyana Marika, 56, from Yirrkala community in northeast Arnhem Land, said images of young men brawling, smashing shops and frightening people were confronting and needed to stop.

Baker Boy rising: from Arnhem Land to sharing a stage with Dizzee Rascal

On stage, Baker Boy is the kind of rapper who can get a crowd airborne within seconds. He’s all ego, gold chains and boundless energy, flitting between his native Yolngu Matha and English, imploring the audience to “step back, feel the power of my blackness”. He commands the mic and didgeridoo as if they’re extensions of his tall, agile frame, and inverts himself mid-flow with audacious breakdancing moves.

He is the first Indigenous artist to have mainstream success rapping in the Yolngu Matha language, his singles Cloud 9 and Marryuna receiving solid Triple J airplay. In the past few months he has swept the National Indigenous Music awards, inked a record deal with Select Music (home to the Preatures and Amy Shark), been rostered on the summer music festival circuit, was handpicked by Dizzee Rascal to be his Australian support act, and recorded a remix of Treaty with Yothu Yindi.

Family of Gurrumul Yunupingu allows use of name and image to preserve legacy

Late musician Gurrumul Yunupingu will be identified by his full name and his image can be shown, says his family in order to preserve his music and memory.

The mourning family of late indigenous Australian musician Gurrumul Yunupingu is breaking with cultural tradition to allow the use of his name and ensure his legacy lives on.

“The immediate family of Gurrumul have been clear throughout the grieving process that the contribution he made and continues to make to Australian and Yolngu cultural life should not be forgotten,” his record label Skinnyfish Music said in a statement.

Arnhem Land: Where Australia Day means ‘thankyou’

WHILE some denounce Australia Day as Invasion Day, an Aboriginal clan from northeast Arnhem Land uses it to welcome doctors, nurses, teachers, police and the community to their land and to thank them for their contributions.

On Thursday, the Rirratjingu clan will hold a bungul, or welcoming ceremony, in the township of Nhulunbuy, to bring people together.